slavery

Books

Sarah Osborn’s World, by Catherine A. Brekus

Spring books

Catherine Brekus introduces us to a disturbing, heartbreaking and improbably inspiring life. Sarah Osborn’s early years were an unending series of afflictions made worse by the austere Calvinism of her family and church. Born in England in 1714, Sarah emigrated to America with her parents, who settled in Rhode Island.

Books

The Long Walk to Freedom, edited by Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise

The runaway slave narratives compiled by Devon Carbado and Donald Weise are as moving as any story by Suzanne Collins or J.R.R. Tolkien.

Books

Bound and free

Paul Harvey's introduction to the history of African-American Christianity emphasizes both the fraught relationship between black and white Christians and the tensions within black religious institutions and communities.

Books

Mightier Than the Sword, by David S. Reynolds

Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin stands alongside Benjamin Frank­lin's Autobiography, Thomas Paine's Common Sense and Frederick Douglass's Narrative as an Ameri­can classic. Any liberally educated person needs to know something about Eliza, Uncle Tom, Eva and the notorious Simon Legree.

Books

Lincoln’s paradoxes

Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President, by Allen C. Guelzo

Books

Runaway Slaves, by John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger

Until fairly recently, scholars have not known very much about the everyday lives of enslaved African Americans. But in the past 20 years a wealth of historical studies has lent considerable insight into the worlds of the men, women and children held in bondage in North America. We now know a great deal about how they worked, worshiped, ate and attempted to keep their families together.