Books

Books

Cover Story

One Good Book deserves another

The Bible and books that illuminate it

The Century invited people to comment on their favorite book of the Bible and a book that has helped them appreciate or understand the biblical text.

Reckoning with racism

A review of Drew G. I. Hart

Why does the church participate in modern-day lynching, or at most turn a blind eye, rather than protesting as our faith would dictate?

Emancipation and economics

A review of Harold Holzer and Norton Garfinkle

Lincoln understood that the dream of well-being, if not radically democratized, would for some people only be a nightmare.

Graphic grief

A review of Tom Hart

We grieve always alone while at the same time needing community. Surely there is a role for the church in this paradox.

Poetic nothingness

A review of Rita Mae Reese

This collection is suffused with one of poetry’s most fundamental aims: making meaning out of suffering and loss.

The genesis of kinship

A review of William Greenway and Amanda Beckenstein Mbuvi

The ancient stories of Genesis bear witness to a created world that is interconnected and has value in God’s eyes.

Picturing dementia

A review of Roz Chast and Dana Walrath

Dementia is graphic. These illustrated narratives draw out insights to provide empathy and healing for caregivers.

Novel exegesis

A review of Mary Rakow

The lines between sacred history and contemporary life are wonderfully, miraculously blurred.

Carnal theology

A review of Mayra Rivera

Flesh is indeterminate. It flows, changes over time, and is consumed and transformed. It becomes the reality of rich spiritual encounter.

Faith’s ghastly legacy

A review of Dominic Erdozain

Christians fail to realize that the responsibility for rebellion against the faith lies invariably at their own door.

Precarious housing

A review of Matthew Desmond

In poor communities like the one where I live and work, evictions are not the exception. They’re the norm.

Haunting particularities

A review of Marilynne Robinson

To meet others as God meets us—prickly and imprecise and difficult though we may sometimes be—is a kind of grace.

Hannah Arendt and Theology, by John Kiess

Balancing political realism with an openness to grace is not easy. But Arendt and Kiess propose just such a balance, so that “politics becomes the art of being born.” 

Pure Christian sex?

A review of Sarah Moslener and Dianna Anderson

Human sexuality is fraught, particularly when mixed with the complexities of culture, religion, patriarchy, and adolescence.

Poetic solitude

A review of Michael N. McGregor

From his youth Lax experienced a love of God that would not abate, calling him toward both solitude and engagement with others.

The Finest Traditions of My Calling, by Abraham M. Nussbaum

Nussbaum, a psychiatrist who labels himself a “bad Catholic,” delves with religious fervor into the mystery of his calling to serve people who suffer. Guided by mentors like Basil of Caesarea, Hilde­gard of Bingen, and Stanley Hauerwas, he envisions medical care as a precious craft honed by the development of virtue. 

Politics beyond party

A review of Kristopher Norris and Sam Speers

Do we bring our preformed politics into church or does the church transform us into disciples who practice a Jesus kind of politics?