The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian Theology

To be a Christian is to be a theologian, because by definition all Christians, lay or clergy, engage in God-talk. The only question is whether this conversation is well informed. For theological conversation to occur, we need the kind of resources that lay out the basic issues, perspectives and players—and what better resource to have close at hand than a comprehensive, up-to-date dictionary that is accessible to both clergy and educated laypeople, a dictionary with breadth of perspective. Such a request is a tall order, but the editors of The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian Theology have attempted to meet the need. As with any such work, the results are mixed, but the fact that the attempt has been made needs to be celebrated.

 

This article is available to subscribers only. Please subscribe for full access—subscriptions begin at $4.95. Already have an online account? Log in now. Already a print subscriber? Create an online account for no additional cost.

This article is available to subscribers only.

To post a comment, log inregister, or use the Facebook comment box.