Holocaust

Film

Sarah’s Key

Directed by Gilles Paquet-Brenner

Sarah's Key is culled from a popular novel (by Tatiana de Rosnay) set during the Holocaust and the Nazi occupation of France. The main character, an Amer­i­can magazine writer (Kristin Scott Thomas) living in Paris, discovers that her husband's family acquired their home after the Jews who once lived there were sent to an abandoned stadium, where they endured three hellish days before the Nazis transported them to the camps.

Books

Ending the era of Auschwitz

Too much Holocaust consciousness?

The Holocaust in American Life, by Peter Novick

Books

Israel’s covenant

O Jerusalem! The Contested Future of the Jewish Covenant, by Marc H. Ellis

Books

Cross and swastika

Betrayal: German Churches and the Holocaust, edited by Robert P. Ericksen and Susannah Heschel

Books

God After Auschwitz, by Zachary Braiterman

Zachary Braiterman challenges a well-subscribed theory about the delay in the expression of post-Holocaust thought and the onset of dialogue. Often understood as a kind of post-traumatic stress response, the near quarter-century of silence is due more to "discursive factors" than the "psychologism" of shock, Braiterman proposes.

Books

Something evolving

City of God, by E.L. Doctorow

Books

Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity During the Holocaust, by Victoria J. Barnett

On a wall of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., is a quotation from Israeli historian Yahuda Bauer: "Thou shalt not be a victim. Thou shalt not be a perpetrator. Above all, thou shalt not be a bystander." At first glance, the "above all" is problematic. Why is it not better to be a passive witness to evil than an active agent?