Arts+Culture

Arts+Culture

We Are the Eighth Day, © Melanie Weidner

Film

Where the Wild Things Are

Spike Jonze’s film of Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s book, Where the Wild Things Are, substitutes pop psychology for Sendak’s exuberant, anarchic vision of childhood. Sendak’s hero is a boy named Max who’s sent to bed when his high spirits turn the corner into aggressiveness. He finds his room transformed into a jungle inhabited by savage creatures who make him their king.
Poetry

"And the angel left her"

            Luke 1:38

So there she stood alone amid a stillness
as loud as any earthquake she had heard,
the eaves creaking in the absence of wind,
the hiss and tick of radiators warming
the house along with a soon-coming sun.
Her hands touch her belly, swelling already
like dough cupped close in an earthen bowl.
She knows it won’t be long before she shows.
What to do with all this sudden silence?
Phone her boyfriend: Joseph, I have news!
E-mail St. Anne: Dear Mother, I’m afraid.
Drop to her knees, now weak with recognition
and kiss the space he filled a moment past
in answer to the question he had asked.

Film

The Invention of Lying

In the make-believe world of The Invention of Lying, everyone strictly obeys God’s ninth commandment. Alas, in spinning this ambitious morality play, the filmmakers violate a screenwriting commandment: thou shalt not get cold feet in the third act.
Poetry

Prayer

I’ve heard of scuba divers in frozen lakes
with tow lines up to snow machines, idling in the sun.

These divers turn upside down, inflate their vests
to press their feet tight against the underbelly of the ice.

With that false tug of gravity in place, the illusion is complete
and they can signal for a pull from up above.

They skate, I’ve heard, across the bottom of the ice and then,
like me, follow their breath bubbles down: To fall up through
a hole into the sky.