Arts+Culture

Arts+Culture

We Are the Eighth Day, © Melanie Weidner

Poetry

Reflections in a spoon

Hunger is a bowl of reflected light,
a concave mirror of flight,
an image reversed,
the breech birth
of an angel floating from Earth
feet first.
Poetry

How it comes this time

Did God create the microbes, too?
On which day did God say,
“Let there be Brie”?

Are these, then, messengers of the Holy One—
Clostridium Gabriel Difficile and
Staphylococcus Michael Aureus?
The seraphim Influenza and Pneumonia?

No drunk driver will take her away.
No warriors wage this assault.
No mugger, no terrorist, no drive-by shooter.
No one to blame. No one.

Unlike the monotonic booping of her monitor
And tweeting IVAC pump,
Her ventilator pipes an almost merry tune
From time to time,
Like close encounters of some kind,
While tiny creatures who, naturally,
Dance in colonies on heads of pins,
Swing, Lo, to carry her home





Film

Wendy and Lucy

Wendy Carroll (Michelle Williams) is a homeless woman driving cross-country with her dog, Lucy, and sleeping in her car at night to save money and stay warm. One morning, her car won’t start. Her funds are limited, and she finds herself at the mercy of the local mechanic (Will Patton). She panics and shoplifts some dog food. She is caught and arrested.
Poetry

Spring 1964

In June the World’s Fair with bright red strawberries
and cream over seared Belgian waffles. It grows hot.
Trapped in the crowd, a tangled skein of nerves,
lost and hungry for quiet, for tenderness, I ride
with my aunt on a long conveyor belt to see the Pietà.
So gentle the grieving, tranquil mother with her downcast
eyes, the stone folds still around her, the cold flesh
of her perfect son. She does not attempt to cry.
My aunt, primed by The Agony and the Ecstasy, leans
to recognize “Buonarroti” on the chiseled band, tasting
the contours of each round unaccustomed syllable.
She whispers the name. She will not last two years.
Silent, thrilled and careful as dancers, when we step off
on solid ground we are joined by our secret, sworn
never to tell what we have no words to say. This is how
it will be in the winter we take our leave: bitter flakes
in a sharp ribbon of wind beyond tears or anger,
the long frozen loop home from the hospital waiting
for me, as we both know. Suddenly shy and tongue-tied
as a girl, she will reach out from her bed to touch me,
recalling too the marble brow, faintly wrinkled,
the white hand, open, as if it were asking a question.