Sex and the Soul: Juggling Sexuality, Spirituality, Romance, and Religion on America's College Campuses

When I was a student at St. Olaf College in the 1990s, sex was not the center of my educational experience. Of course, it had its place. But I was busy with a lot of other things too. I was concerned about my future. I was cultivating friendships and contemplating a life of service in a way perhaps embarrassingly akin to what college administrators hoped for when they fashioned the college vision statement. I studied a lot, traveled abroad and spent a lot of late nights talking with both male and female friends. My friends and I did not date in the way that previous generations did, but neither were we participants in hookup culture the way it is currently portrayed. We simply did our best to learn about relationships and partners on our own terms—not flawlessly, not always in ways we wanted to tell our mothers about, but not without moral conviction either.

 

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