The Oxford Guide to the Book of Common Prayer

Nothing illustrates the evolution of Anglicanism more than the changing role of the Book of Common Prayer. For centuries the prayer book served as a primary source of unity—a sign of equanimity, timelessness and grace that bound the communion together and linked it to its roots. It was viewed as a testimony to the majesty of the English language, the senior of the three great monuments to English prose style (the other two being Shakespeare’s works and the King James Bible). But at present the position of the Book of Common Prayer is far different. The Oxford Guide helps readers to understand how and why this change has occurred.

 

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