Century Marks

Century Marks

Champion the vote

A group of venture capitalists is backing United in Purpose, a nonprofit organization that is trying to influence the outcome of the 2012 election by registering 5 million conservative Christians. Using a sophisticated data mining procedure, it is compiling a database of every unregistered evangelical, conservative Christian in the country. The organization's Champion the Vote campaign has a website that lists right to life, religious freedom and traditional marriage as its top priorities. Technology entrepreneur Ken Eldred, one of its financial backers, says that one day God will ask people how they voted (Chicago Tribune, September 18).

Selfless prayer

Gabrielle Apollon, whose mother emigrated from Haiti to Canada as a child, was in Haiti when the earthquake struck in January 2010. She quickly became involved in treating the wounded. With few supplies and no medical training, Apollon couldn't do much. Instead, she tried to comfort the wounded by holding their hands, singing to them and praying for them. When she asked 14-year-old Emmanuella if she would like to pray, Emmanuella volunteered to pray first for Apollon. Barely mentioning her own pain, Emmanuella prayed that God would be able to use Apollon and herself too. "God sent you here to be with me," she told Apollon (Dissent, Summer).

Cardinal prophecy

In March 2003, Pope John Paul II sent a letter to President George W. Bush trying to discourage him from invading Iraq and overthrowing Saddam Hussein. The letter was delivered in person by Cardinal Pio Laghi, a Bush family friend. President Bush, without opening the letter, set it on a table and launched into a defense of war against Iraq, saying he believed it was God's will. The cardinal told the president three things would happen if Iraq were invaded: it would cause many deaths and injuries on both sides; a civil war would ensue; and the U.S. would have difficulty extricating itself from the war (Vatican Insider, September 30).

Immigrant entrepreneur

Here is a headline you may not have seen: "Steve Jobs Dies: He Was the Most Famous Arab in the World." The father of the innovative head of Apple was from Syria. Jobs's parents, who weren't married, gave him up for adoption. Despite the political unrest plaguing Syria, many Syrians celebrated Jobs's accomplishments when he died. One Syrian admitted: "I think that if he had lived in Syria, he would not have been able to achieve any of this, or else he would have chosen to leave Syria" (The Lede, New York Times, October 6).

German spirits

New guidelines issued by the Evangelical (Lutheran) Church in Germany, that country's largest Protestant body, advise parishioners not to invest in companies that make hard liquor, though beer and wine producers are fine. The guidelines are meant to help investors invest their money wisely but morally in the wake of the financial crisis that has roiled world markets since 2007. The guidelines also discourage investing in companies that manufacture guns or pornography or in countries that are considered dictatorships or present a risk to the environment (RNS).