Century Marks

Century Marks

Charity check

Over 7,000 charities are devoted to fighting cancer, but many of them are very small and some are quite inefficient. In 2009 the Children's Cancer Research Fund gave $2.7 million to the University of Minnesota, its sole beneficiary, for cancer research—but it spent $9.8 million to raise that money. A major reason for inefficient charities is that they aren't accountable. Before contributing to charities, check out their rating with an organization like Charity Navigator (Time, June 13).

Modern cathedrals

In his travels about the country as a church consultant, Anthony Robinson has noticed that in many cities the manufacturing plants are shuttered and office buildings vacant. The only institutions that seem to be thriving are hospitals and medical centers, which not only have the latest in medical technology but in some cases incorporate shops, spas, community centers and destination restaurants. These lavish new medical facilities, aimed at the well-insured and affluent, make Robinson skeptical about keeping the cost of health care in check. He calls these elaborate medical facilities our modern cathedrals—evidence that health care is at the center of our lives (Crosscut, June 1).

Looking back

When historian David McCullough was asked what future generations will wonder about us, he answered, "How we could have spent so much time watching TV" (Time.com, June 20).

Tax dollars at work

Kentucky taxpayers are about to subsidize a theme park based on a replica of Noah's ark. The subsidies come in the form of tax incentives. The theme park, developed by an organization called Answers in Genesis, was the brainstorm of the Creation Museum in Kentucky, which advances a literal interpretation of the Genesis account of creation. "The ministry of Answers in Genesis can't think of a more effective way today to share the gospel with so many millions of people than an ark," states the organization's website (USAToday.com, May 31).

Walking in their shoes

Volunteers at Trinity Episcopal Church in New Haven recently washed the feet of 40 homeless people. They also massaged and put lotion on the feet of these homeless people and gave them new socks and a $40 voucher toward new shoes. In some cases the condition of their feet indicated medical problems, such as diabetes, and a nurse was on hand to treat those problems. Homeless people on average walk 8.5 miles a day (New Haven Independent, April 23).