Century Marks

Century Marks

Bulldozer verdict

In 2003 Rachel Corrie, a young American activist, was run over by an Israeli military bulldozer while she was protesting the demolition of Palestinian houses. An Israeli judge ruled last month that Israel bore no responsibility in Corrie’s death; she put herself in danger and could have distanced herself from it, the judge said. Bill Van Esveld of Human Rights Watch responded: “The idea that there can be no fault for killing civilians in a combat operation contradicts Israel’s international legal obligations to spare civilians from harm during armed conflict and to credibly investigate and punish violations by its force.” The Corrie family plans to appeal the verdict to the Israeli Supreme Court (New York Times, August 29).

The nonevent

Rick Warren, pastor of the Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California, has said he’s canceling a presidential forum with President Obama and Mitt Romney because he doesn’t think they can have a civil conversation. It appears that neither candidate had agreed to participate and that such an event was never scheduled. Warren held a forum with both candidates in the 2008 campaign (TNR.com, August 23).

Election night worship

A grassroots movement is encouraging churches to do something together on election night to signify and embody their oneness in Christ: gather at church to hold communion around the Lord’s Table. Called Election Day Communion, this effort aims to build unity in Christ in spite of theological, political and denominational differences (electiondaycommunion.org).

True joy

According to a fable, St. Francis of Assisi told Brother Leo that true joy comes not from success but in rejection and suffering, which cause us to reflect on Jesus’ pain and rejection. St. Francis compared it to coming back to the friary on a cold winter night and being told by the person who came to the door that he was a simpleton, that he couldn’t come in and should go away. It’s not that suffering is good for us. The point is that pain is a reality of life and that God is present in all reality, including pain and suffering (Weavings, August/September/October).

In the fishbowl

Episcopal priest Barney Hawkins says that parishioners take an interest in the personal lives of priests and pastors and their families. He recalls that in one parish he didn’t want to call attention to the car he drove, so he didn’t trade in his cars until necessary—and then bought replacements that were much the same as the previous model. When he was roasted before leaving that parish, some members put on a skit—with photos for documentation—about the three gray boxy station wagons he had owned while serving there. Hawkins says that church members look at ordained leaders for their authenticity and their flaws (Episcopal Etiquette and Ethics, Morehouse).