Century Marks

Century Marks

An App for that

Exodus Inter­national has developed an application (or app) for Apple's iPhone that purports to deliver "freedom from homosexuality through the power of Jesus Christ." The app is a resource for meetings, videos and news stories that suggest one can "grow into heterosexuality." Apple gave the app a 4+ rating, meaning that it contained "no objectionable material." But after Truth Wins Out, a pro-gay group, launched a petition against the "gay cure app," as it became known, Apple pulled it from its website. Exodus International is petitioning to have the app reinstated (theatlantic.com and exodusinternational.org).

Student athletes

Speaking at the annual convention of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Education Secretary Arne Duncan proposed that collegiate teams who don't graduate 40 percent of their players should be ineligible for postseason competition. He pointed out that a fourth of the teams in the 2010 Division I men's basketball tournament had a graduation rate below 40 percent; four teams graduated none of their black players, while five had a 100 percent graduation rate. Duncan was a co-captain of the basketball team at Harvard and a first-team Academic All-American (InsideHigherEd, January 15).

Rite of passage

After World War II some Japanese communities created a ritual to help their returning soldiers reenter society. The soldiers would be thanked and profusely praised for their service, and then an elder would make an authoritative proclamation: "The war is now over! The community needs you to let go of what served you and served us well up to now. The community needs you to return as a man, a citizen, and something beyond a soldier" (Richard Rohr, Falling Upward, Jossey-Bass).

Bell’s hell

Chad Holtz, a United Methodist pastor in North Carolina, says he has long had doubts about the traditional Christian view of hell. When he made a favorable Facebook comment about Love Wins, a book by popular evangelical pastor Rob Bell that questions that view, Holtz was relieved of his pastorate. Bell challenges the notion that hell is a place of eternal torment for people who aren't Christians and argues that an emphasis on hell is misplaced, although he denies that he is a universalist. Says Holtz: "So long as we believe there's a dividing point in eternity, we're going to think in terms of us and them. But when you believe God has saved everyone, the point is, you're saved. Live like it" (Associated Press).

Different approach

Without mentioning the hearings that were convened by Representative Peter King (R., N.Y.) on the threat posed by radicalized Amer­ican Muslims, Senator Dick Durbin (D., Ill.) scheduled Senate hearings on the threats to American Muslims' civil rights. In announcing his plans, Durbin cited a spike "in anti-Muslim bigotry," including the burning of the Qur'an and an increase in hate crimes and hate speech toward Muslims. "It is important for our generation to renew our founding charter's commitment to religious diversity and to protect the liberties guaranteed by our Bill of Rights," Durbin said. The Council on American-Islamic Relations, which helped lead the opposition to the House hearings, welcomed the change in tone (RNS).