Century Marks

Century Marks

Space for God

When Anglican theologian Herbert Kelly was asked how we can know the will of God, he responded: “We do not. That is the joke.” Agreeing with Kelly, Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams says we are left with our free will and our power of discernment to decide what in our life comports with the will of God, and then we trust that God will pick us up and restore us if we make a mistake. Key questions to ask in the discernment process: “What course of action might be (even a little) more in tune with the life of Christ? And what opens, rather than closes, doors for God’s healing, reconciling, forgiving and creating work to go on?” (Rowan Williams, Where God Happens).

Revere ware

Paul Revere, made famous by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about his midnight ride, was a Boston engraver and silversmith. Brown University recently discovered a small engraving by Revere that was tucked inside an old medical book donated to Brown by a member of the class of 1773. It shows Jesus being baptized by immersion. Revere was a Unitarian (NPR, April 15).

Normal folk

Since 2010 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has been running a public relations campaign featuring diverse Americans with the tagline, “I am Mormon.” The aim is to show that “Mormons are not that strange,” said one spokesperson. The More Good Foundation is also backing the church’s efforts to present a good image on the Internet. One of its objectives is to help people searching for information get to Mormon-friendly sites rather than hostile sites run by evangelical Chris­tians and ex-Mormons (Wilson Quarter­ly, Spring).

Sharing stories

Members of the Temple B’nai Jeshurun in Des Moines, Iowa, wanted to throw the book at two teens, a boy and his girlfriend, who had scribbled neo-Nazi graffiti on their synagogue. Instead, Rabbi Steven Fink met with the youths as part of a restorative justice process. At the meeting, several Holocaust survivors told their stories. The male perpetrator told about his childhood of abuse and of running away from home and linking up with the Aryan Nation. The youths were told that in the Jewish tradition they had to earn forgiveness. Each performed 200 hours of service for the synagogue, at the end of which the charges were dropped (Des Moines Register, April 22).

Aftershocks

When police tried to get help for a military veteran found wandering naked on a California street, the Veterans Administration hospital said it couldn’t take him until morning. Later, the man was killed when he stepped in front of a train, an apparent suicide. About 25 American soldiers will take their own lives for every one killed on the battlefield this year, says columnist Nicholas D. Kristof. More than 6,500 veteran suicides take place every year, more than the total killed in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. The V. A., which has established a suicide hotline and appointed suicide-prevention coordinators, is trying to overcome the warrior mentality that views mental health concerns as a sign of weakness (New York Times, April 14).