Deconstructing Theodicy: Why Job Has Nothing to Say to the Puzzle of Suffering

The problem of evil has plagued Christians for centuries. It has led Augustine to suggest the free-will defense, Hume to doubt God’s existence, thoughtful Christians to question their faith and a host of philosophical theologians to develop various permutations allowing God to coexist with evil.

Toward a theology of disability

Wheelchair ramps and assistive listening devices notwithstanding, Christian churches can be inhospitable to those whose minds or bodies fall outside the narrow spectrum we


Gustav Niebuhr was a longtime religion reporter for the New York Times and is the grandson of H. Richard Niebuhr. In this book, he reflects on both of those experiences and how they shaped his understanding of America’s diverse religious landscape.

Absence of thought

Susan Jacoby is a formidable social critic who writes from a progressive stance and in an accessible style.

God, Evil, and Design: An Introduction to the Philosophical Issues

A world more full of weeping than [we] can understand.” David O’Connor quotes this line from Yeats in the first sentence of his book on God and the problem of evil. His conclusion at the end of the book is that a world with both God and evil cannot be understood. One of the terms has to go, and it is God.