A Power Governments Cannot Suppress

Howard Zinn wants to do history justly. He seeks to bear witness to a past that’s never exactly past, and the acts of remembering he demands of his audience (and himself) mesh seamlessly with an intense and determined awareness of present goings-on. Zinn understands that remembrance and awareness don’t come naturally to us.

Our Mother Saint Paul

Paul is the New Testament figure that many Christians love to hate. To gain a new hearing for the apostle, Beverly Roberts Gaventa, professor of New Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary, offers a new way to think about him: by means of his mothering imagery.


When I speak to mainline Protestants about church life, I usually get questions, often only half-formulated, about megachurches.

Reading Romans

Those paying the $90 price for this commentary in the distinguished Hermenia series can scarcely complain that the book was lightly tossed off. It includes 70 pages of front matter (such as bibliography), 125 pages of back matter (indices and the like) and over 1,000 pages of commentary—actually, given the double-column format, 2,000 pages.

Playing with God

Baker, a sports historian and professor emeritus at the University of Maine, has written a valuable story about the engagement of religion with sports. He focuses on U.S.