Living Thoughtfully, Dying Well, by Glen E. Miller

Miller, an internist, has coronary heart disease. A survivor of a number of heart incidents, he decided to become proactive about his life so that, to the degree possible, he could have a good death. For him, a good death is one in which he maintains his privacy and dignity, has a sense of control over events, dies in a way which reflects the way he’s lived, creates loving memories for his family, reduces the end-of-life costs, and dies at home. As it turns out, dying well means living well: working at relationships that matter, giving attention to one’s spiritual life, serving others, and putting in place things like a living will. Miller brings to this topic a lifetime of experience as a doctor, including time assisting Mother Teresa in India. He also brings a theological education and the perspectives of both a hospital administrator and a patient.

 

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