Ghost Town

The first “ghost comedy” was an effervescent 1937 charmer called Topper, in which two of the most elegant high comedians in movies, Cary Grant and Constance Bennett, crashed their roadster and immediately rebounded, their insouciant personalities utterly unchanged, as specters. That’s the joke on which ghost comedies are premised: death doesn’t alter a thing except corporeal reality.

The other convention of the genre is that though the ghosts have left the realm of the living, their link to the people they’ve left behind isn’t severed. Either they have unfinished business of their own to pursue or a new role to play in the lives of the living.

 

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