BookMarks

Charles Darwin’s great-great-grandson and a successful Hollywood screenwriter describes the 2005 “intelligent design” trial in Dover, Pennsylvania. The native-born Brit loves his adopted American home, but is terrified at the rise of a belligerent fundamentalism that is contemptuous of such scientific commonplaces as evolution. The 40 days and nights of the trial convinced him that ID should indeed be taught in every science classroom in America: as an exercise in removing the kid gloves with which religion is treated in this country, science teachers should demolish ID before their pupils’ eyes. The strength of the book is its presentation as an old-fashioned courtroom drama, which stays lively even though readers know how the trial will turn out.

 

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