The gospel alternative

For many people the phrase “Paul and politics” refers to nothing more than Romans 13 and the common conclusion that Paul was basically a conservative supporter of government as a divinely appointed institution. But in the last decade or so the study of Paul and his politics has undergone a sea change, represented in the work of diverse scholars, including Neil Elliott, Richard Horsley and N. T. Wright.

 

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