Century Marks

Century Marks

Now or never

An open letter from scientists published in the MIT Technology Review urges President Obama to make addressing global warming the top priority of his second term. The letter, which recognizes that many Americans remain skeptical about global warming, criticizes the president for bungling efforts to create green jobs. It calls on him to impose a carbon tax and fund trillions of dollars worth of research. “We can no longer pretend that addressing climate change will be without real costs” (Washington Examiner, January 12).

A cut apart

Theologian and Bible scholar Rudolf Bultmann grew up in a family shaped by the pietist revival in Germany. His father, a pastor, eventually became a liberal, but his mother re­mained attached to the pietist tradition. The two took their theological differences to their graves. The tombstone of Bultmann’s father reads: “I believe in God my father,” a line that reflects the theological liberalism of Adolf Harnack. His mother’s tomb­stone declares, “I know that my redeemer lives” (Konrad Hammann, Rudolf Bultmann: A Biography, Polebridge).

Takeover

As late as the mid-1970s the National Rifle Association (founded in 1871) focused on hunting, conservation and marksmanship. But at its annual meeting in 1977 it was taken over by radical gun rights activists, who reshaped the group’s orientation. The old guard had plans to move headquarters to Colorado, but the new leaders decided that the real action was in Washington. Today the NRA is arguably the most powerful lobbying organization in the country. William J. Vizzard, a retired Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms official, says the NRA has no interest in compromise. “They’re not interested in fixing things. They want to stir things up, and the more they stir things up, the more members they get and the more money they make” (Washington Post, January 12).

Heart and head

Canadian re­searchers compared Anglican and Pente­costal responses to sermons and found, unsurprisingly, that Anglicans prefer more significant intellectual content than do Pentecostals. Yet participants from both groups responded to sermons predominantly on the basis of their emotional appeal. Both Anglicans and Pentecostals favored sermons dealing with grace and forgiveness (Anglican Journal, January 10).

Virtue, not vice

Justin Welby, the recently named archbishop of Canter­bury and a former oil executive, sits on a commission in the United Kingdom reviewing the culture and standards of banking. He does not think that adding regulations is the way to address the crisis in the banking industry. He noted that the head of a major bank told him that it has 3,500 compliance officers and 900 lawyers on staff. What banking needs is virtue, according to the archbishop. “Financial services must serve society, not rule it. They must be integrated into the economy, not semidetached,” he said (Bloomberg, January 10).