religious pluralism

Books

Free on the inside

Joshua Dubler shows up at a maximum-security prison as a budding ethnographer. He becomes a man captured by friendships.

Books

The Cambridge Companion to Christian Doctrine, edited by Colin E. Gunton

Academic theology can have a future only if theologians themselves are interested in it. Why should anybody else read it if theologians are so caught up in experimenting with every philosophical movement and political program that they ignore their own field? If this volume is any indication, theology seems to have rediscovered itself as a tradition with its own resources and issues.

Books

Christian America?, by Christian Smith

Armed with data from surveys and interviews, Smith skewers the notion that all conservative evangelicals are deeply uncomfortable with American pluralism and eager to impose a fundamentalist Christian worldview.

Books

Between Church and State, by James W. Fraser

The often uninformed and partisan climate of the current dialogue about religion and public education makes this book, which provides a sane historical context for the debate, especially valuable. James W. Fraser succeeds in shedding light rather than heat on this potentially contentious issue.

Books

Revelation, the Religions, and Violence, by Leo D. Lefebure

Why are so many people simultaneously attracted to and repulsed by religion? Why are religions as adept at setting us at each other's throats as they are at linking us with the divine? Leo Lefebure wants to help Christians answer these questions, and he is eminently qualified to do so.

Books

Life with others

The soaring modernist chapel at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, built in 1962, was intended to symbolize America's embrace of religious diversity and interfaith harmony: different spaces for Protestant, Catholic and Jewish services each "accommodat[ed] within a single enclosure," as one architectural review put it.  Alas, the design's messages about religious equality were decid