Karl Barth

Books

Hauerwas, by Nicholas M. Healy

Nicholas Healy's central methodological criticism of Stanley Hauerwas is that he "is concerned with the logic of coming to believe and the logic of Christian living rather more than the logic of belief."

Books

Drawn to Freedom, by Eberhard Busch

In this long, freewheeling conversation with the Heidelberg Catechism, Eberhard Busch sometimes uses the document for leverage against distortions in the contemporary church, and sometimes challenges its assumptions.

Books

Emil Brunner: A Reappraisal, by Alister E. McGrath

Alistair McGrath offers an intellectual history of Emil Brunner's life and thought—and pleads for a recovery of his theology.

Books

Approaching the End, by Stanley Hauerwas

Stanley Hauerwas’s book is about learning how to die and training how to be human. Broadly speaking, it is a book about time and purpose—or, better said, the purpose of time.

Books

Reinventing Liberal Christianity, by Theo Hobson

Theo Hobson’s ambitious book traces the historical emergence and fate of liberal theology in the modern period. He defends the “liberal state” and the way good liberal Christianity is allied with it.

Books

Reading for Preaching, by Cornelius Plantinga Jr.

Cornelius Plantinga Jr. contends that to be fully prepared to share a word from God with a congregation, a preacher should attend to storytellers, biographers, poets and journalists.

Books

Intimate partners

Charlotte von Kirschbaum and Karl Barth: A Study in Biography and the History of Theology, by Suzanne Selinger

Books

The Cambridge Companion to Christian Doctrine, edited by Colin E. Gunton

Academic theology can have a future only if theologians themselves are interested in it. Why should anybody else read it if theologians are so caught up in experimenting with every philosophical movement and political program that they ignore their own field? If this volume is any indication, theology seems to have rediscovered itself as a tradition with its own resources and issues.