After One-Hundred-and-Twenty, by Hillel Halkin

Part history and part memoir, this volume gently immerses readers in Jewish traditions surrounding death.


Unexpected ancestors

Few secrets are as devastating as those that make us rethink our identity. Heidi Neumark discovered one when her daughter Googled their name.


Short Stories by Jesus, by Amy-Jill Levine

Reading Amy-Jill Levine's Short Stories by Jesus, I kept wishing she had published it earlier. It would have saved me some mistakes in the pulpit.


Inheriting Abraham, by Jon D. Levenson

Fall books

As long ago as 1996, Jon Levenson wrote an important article, “The Universal Horizon of Biblical Particularism.” In that piece he reflected on the way in which the Hebrew Bible adjudicated the particularity of Israel and a reach beyond Israel to the nations.


The Jewish Annotated New Testament, edited by Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Zvi Brettler

Spring books

One of the most interesting shifts in Christian theology after the Shoah was in how the adjective Jewish was used. In the patristic era, to call someone’s work Jewish was to insult it: the work was too fleshly or legalistic. Since the Shoah, to call someone’s work Jewish is to praise it as appropriately this-worldly, concerned with the ordinary stuff of life, embodied.