Books

Books

Sons of Mississippi

One picture has become a symbol of white resistance to James Meredith’s 1962 entrance to the University of Mississippi as its first African-American student: the Life magazine photograph, taken by Charlie Moore, showing seven white sheriffs gathered in a campus grove, one of them swinging a billy club.
Cover Story

Pop pulpits

I know what it’s like to be a preacher desperate for some point of contact with an otherwise inert congregation.

Scholarship and Christian Faith/Educating for Shalom

In higher education discussions about how faith claims should relate to secular claims, Lutherans like to say that they are not like the Calvinists, who want to transform the latter to fit with the former.

Help wanted

A mere two years after publishing an absorbing study of anger, Garret Keizer has produced a probing work on an even thornier subject. Is help, as Keizer asserts, the original human dilemma? Was Eve only trying to help Adam when she offered him that piece of fruit?

Blood Done Sign My Name

On a summer day in 1970, ten-year-old Tim Tyson was playing with his neighborhood friend, Gerald Teel, when Gerald whispered to him, “Daddy and Roger and ’em shot a nigger.” That murder set in motion a racial conflict that rocked the small tobacco town of Oxford, North Carolina.