Books

Books

The New Westminster Dictionary of Christian Spirituality

Gordon Wakefield, the editor of this volume’s 1983 predecessor, began his introduction with the observation that the word spirituality is “very much in vogue among Christians of our time.” What a difference a quarter century makes: the interest in spirituality has extended even farther, and in every imaginable direc

The misfits

I think I might qualify as a Crunchy Conservative. I wear Birkenstocks whenever weather permits. My wife and I worry about our children becoming too much the target market. We buy organic an awful lot. When my friends and I grapple with issues, we ask the age-old question: What would Wendell Berry do?

Chaos management

Paul Bremer landed in Baghdad on May 12, 2003, and departed little more than a year later, on June 28, 2004.

Leaving Church

In her first book, The Preaching Life, Barbara Brown Taylor delighted readers with a seamless sewing together of divinity school memories, scripture, and ruminations on the beauty of the liturgical calendar and life in a congregation. That book inspired others to follow the call to ministry, as did the ten books that followed.

Upon the Altar of the Nation

For author Harry Stout, the legitimacy of going to war (jus ad bellum) is one thing; the legitimacy of how the war is conducted (jus in bello) is another. The moral problem of the Civil War does not lie in the decision to go to battle—according to Stout, preserving the Union and eradicating slavery offered reason enough. He makes clear that he is not a pacifist and that fighting is sometimes a lesser evil. Rather, the moral problem lies in how the war was conducted.