Books

Books

Sons of Mississippi

One picture has become a symbol of white resistance to James Meredith’s 1962 entrance to the University of Mississippi as its first African-American student: the Life magazine photograph, taken by Charlie Moore, showing seven white sheriffs gathered in a campus grove, one of them swinging a billy club.

Doktè Paul

As Dr. Paul Farmer administers a spinal tap to a 13-year-old girl at his clinic in Cange, Haiti, the child begins shouting in Creole: “Li fe-m mal, mwen grangou!”

A cure for what ails us

What do philosophers do? Do they, like other academics, get doctorates, publish for fellow academics, strive for tenure and advance up the academic ladder? Alain de Botton defines a philosopher not as an ambitious academic, but as one who asks hard questions. Why do people work? Why do we travel? Why do we love?

Blood Done Sign My Name

On a summer day in 1970, ten-year-old Tim Tyson was playing with his neighborhood friend, Gerald Teel, when Gerald whispered to him, “Daddy and Roger and ’em shot a nigger.” That murder set in motion a racial conflict that rocked the small tobacco town of Oxford, North Carolina.