The Oxford Guide to the Book of Common Prayer

Nothing illustrates the evolution of Anglicanism more than the changing role of the Book of Common Prayer. For centuries the prayer book served as a primary source of unity—a sign of equanimity, timelessness and grace that bound the communion together and linked it to its roots.

The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East

Palestinians, Israelis and others active in peace and human rights work sigh when political dilettantes come to the Holy Land convinced that they will start the dialogue group that will bring peace—as though no one had thought of promoting dialogue before.

Ultimate victory

Jon Levenson has established himself as the foremost theological interpreter of the Hebrew Bible from a Jewish perspective in a way that contributes to the larger theological discussion.

Alcohol, Addiction and Christian Ethics

As both a clinical psychiatrist and an Anglican priest-theologian at England’s Durham University, Christopher Cook has doubly impressive credentials for writing this book. And as both a Christian ethicist (retired) and a recovering alcoholic (from which there is no retirement), I was doubly eager to read it.

Living the Sabbath

In a high school sociology course called “Man in Society”—the very title dates me—one assignment was to dream up hobbies we might pursue in middle age.